Border Deposit

The Border Zinc-Lead deposit was originally discovered in the early 1970s by Etosha Petroleum Ltd (‘Etosha’). Etosha conducted a limited program of broad spaced diamond drilling and estimated an exploration target of 15-30 Million Tonnes @ 2-5% Zn+Pb to a depth of 300 metres below surface.

Following Sabre's acquisition of the project area in 2007, Sabre set out to test this target and define a JORC resource for the deposit, with the aim of bringing the deposit into production in a suitable economic environment.

 

A model of the mineralisation at Border looking from the east along the strike of the Pavian Trend.

Border is a modified Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) deposit and consists primarily of coarse galena (lead) and sphalerite (zinc) mineralisation within dolomitic host rocks. No pyrite or any other sulphides are present, and weathering is almost non-existent. The deposit dips at 60° to the north, stretches along strike for over 2,400 metres and extends up to 390 m beneath surface (with the bulk of the tonnage and grade within 150 m of surface). The ore body varies between 10 metres and 85 metres in thickness (with an average thickness of 25 metres).

A combination of Reverse Circulation and Diamond drilling has resulted in the estimation of an Inferred Resource (JORC) for the Border Zinc-Lead deposit of:

  16.2 Million Tonnes @ 2.12 % Pb+Zn & 4.76 gpt Ag (at a 1.25% Pb+Zn cut-off)*

*The inferred mineral resource estimate is based on a nominal 0.5% Pb+Zn wireframe cut-off with a maximum internal dilution of five metres. Grade was interpolated using an inverse distance weighting squared (IDW2) technique.

Exceedingly good results from metallurgical and beneficiation test work, as well as positive results from an initial, high-level scoping study meant that the Company could pursue a higher tonnage, lower grade resource than was initially envisaged. The results of these studies are described in the Scoping Study section.

 

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